Root canal – Why root canal?

Root canal – Why root canal?

Root canal

Why root canal?

There are several reasons that the pulp inside the teeth dies, including caries, leaky fillings and dental whipping.
An inflammation or infection inside the tooth means that the pulp is damaged. If you are bothered by a sore throat, sensitivity to cold and heat, swelling and tenderness, it may be a sign of a damaged paw. However, it is not always you get symptoms. A living paw is, of course, preferred, but the tooth can be saved even if the pulp dies. The solution is root treatment.

How does the root treatment work?

Rotary treatment means that the dentist removes the cause of the injury, such as caries, if possible. Then the pulp is removed and the root canals are refilled.
The most common filler material is gutta percha, a rubber-like material that sticks to the canal. Finally, a filler or crown is made as a replacement for the damaged dental crown.
The treatment is usually performed with common local anesthesia and is painless. If the pulp is dead, usually no stunning is required. There is therefore no need to worry that the treatment will hurt.

Treatment

Many dentists have extensive experience in treating pulp damage. Some, however, choose to refer to a specialist – a so-called endodontist.
Correct diagnosis is crucial for successful treatment. With X-ray, the dentist can often detect possible caries attacks and injuries from infections.
The patient’s own history of symptoms and events around the tooth and mouth is information the dentist always asks for. Sometimes the dentist also carefully tests the sensitivity of the tooth to cold and heat. This usually shows if the pulp is alive or not.

How does the root treatment work?

Rotary treatment means that the dentist removes the cause of the injury, such as caries, if possible. Then the pulp is removed and the root canals are refilled. The most common filler material is gutta percha, a rubber-like material that sticks to the canal. Finally, a filler or crown is made as a replacement for the damaged dental crown.
It may take some time to perform a root treatment. Sometimes the root canals are narrow and bent, which can make the work a bit more difficult. The important thing is that the channels are really clean before they are rooted.
The treatment is usually performed with common local anesthesia and is painless. If the pulp is dead, usually no stunning is required. There is therefore no reason to be worried that it will hurt.

Pulpitis

Pulpit means that there is an inflammation in the teeth of the tooth. Inflammation creates a pressure in the pulp which is perceived as painful. An inflamed paw can either heal out or be insecure.
Sometimes it can be difficult to determine if the pulpite will heal or not. An assessment of the appropriate treatment is done on a case by case basis, based on the symptoms.
If there is obvious damage, such as a caries attack, the dentist removes the cause and fills the hole. Then you wait. If the pain does not disappear, it may cause the pulp to be removed and the tooth is rooted.
However, disappearing, on the other hand, the symptoms may mean that the pulpite is hot and the tooth can be considered fresh again. Note that symptom freedom may also mean that the pulp has died.
A root treatment of a toothpulpit can often be done on 1 to 3 visits. Making teeth with a fill or crown sometimes takes 1 to 2 visits. Regardless of the treatment your teeth are, follow-up is always important. This is often done in connection with the regular inspection visits.

Osteitis

When the pulp dies, the overpressure contained within the pulse compartment disappears. The risk of bacteria infecting the dead pulp is then great. If the pulp is infected, the pulp must be removed to make the teeth free from infection. Otherwise, bacteria may descend through the root canal to the jawbone. Over time, it may mean a breakdown outside the root, called osteite.
The treatment against infection means that the dentist cleans the teeth with small special files. A rubber denture around the tooth allows the dentist to work under extra clean conditions.
As an aid, the dentist uses the X-ray. There is a way to check that all root canals are cleared. Usually, the dentist then puts in a bactericidal insert that helps fight the bacteria.
If the infection is complicated, treatment is repeated one or more times. When the tooth is supposed to be germ-free, the root canals are sealed and a crown or fill will eventually build up the damaged dental crown.

Finalization

A root-filled tooth often lacks large parts of the crown. A new crown is often the best treatment.
After a root treatment, you may experience a little pain that can usually be relieved with common pain reliefs. Any pain usually disappears within a few days.
If symptoms persist when the tooth is rooted, you will not usually finish the teeth, but wait a while for the symptoms to get rid of. Sometimes more treatment is needed. The teeth have a provisionally dense fill or crown while waiting for symptom freedom.

Forecast

Scientific studies show that successful root treatments mainly depend on the degree of injury and who performed the treatment. The quality of a previous root treatment depends on how the dentist managed to clear the root canals and how dense the root canal is. The layer or crown on top of the tooth also plays a big role in the result.
A rooted tooth with an infection is often reversible. However, the forecast is somewhat worse compared to a tooth that has not previously been rooted. A previously rooted tooth that has an infection at the root tip can also be treated surgically. For example, this sometimes happens if there is a long pin in the root canal. In such an operation, the rooted tooth can be sealed from the root tip.
Rotation is painless. If the pulp is dead, sometimes it’s not even anesthetic. It is not uncommon with minor problems, such as aches, after a commencement of root treatment. Usually, this is effectively relieved with common pain reliefs.

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